This article is intended to be used by the general public for informational purposes only. It is not intended to be used as a reference for educational research papers, nor is it a reflection of the services available through our Rehab Program in Thailand.

Alcohol Rehabilitation UK (United Kingdom)

Alcohol Rehabilitation UK

Alcohol Rehabilitation UK – Here are details of what those suffering with alcoholism or those with serious drinking issues can do in terms of receiving assistance.

Designated alcohol rehab centres:

These facilities have been established to help alcoholics curb their misuse of alcohol. They also focus on how a better future for themselves and their loved ones can be found. The biggest hurdle to availing of these services is for an alcoholic to quit denial and determine that they really do want to overcome their drinking problems. This takes strong will-power and determination, but those who seek and accept help will most certainly benefit from it.

The day to day running of alcohol rehab centres:

These establishments will either be privately run or run by the state. If state-run they are funded by the government and are part of public health care units, or as part of special initiatives established to help those with alcohol problems. Privately run establishments are run by health care companies or private companies and individuals. These will be seen as profit-oriented organisations unless they are run as charitable enterprises.

One important thing to bear in mind when considering privately run establishments is that they must adhere to the rigorous standards set by the government’s Department of Health. In reality these enterprises will meet, and in many cases, exceed such standards. Their standard of accommodation and facilities available are also seen to be more comprehensive. The more lavish the setting, the more expensive the stay, but the effectiveness of treatment should be something that those looking for help should concentrate on.

Public or private?

Alcohol Rehabilitation UK – It stands to reason that private establishments will offer far more in terms of facilities and many see that the top counselling professionals will plump for working in a private establishment rather than a public one.

Another issue with opting for a public alcohol rehab centre is the issue of waiting lists. There are more people requiring treatment than there are ‘beds’. The frustration of a waiting list can quickly discourage someone with an alcohol problem, and it is likely that they will continue their excessive drinking habits while awaiting treatment. If a person can afford private treatment, or their personal insurance policy covers such treatment then this is the recommended way to go.

If public is your only option:

Alcohol Rehabilitation UK – If no personal insurance policy is available that will cover treatment at a private establishment and the person concerned cannot afford the costs of a private stay, this should not discourage them or end their quest for treatment.

Register for a public rehab centre in-patient stay and accept whatever waiting list is given, but do not leave things there. Take action in terms of visiting drop-in addiction centres for advice and assistance, speak with your doctor to see if they can arrange counselling sessions through government-facilities and counsellors, and join a local voluntary group that has the concern of alcoholics and alcoholism at heart.

Alcoholics Anonymous is by far the most recognised, but other groups in your area should also be considered to see which is the best fit for you. These groups can do wonders in terms of helping you keep off alcohol while you move up the waiting list, and who knows, it may be possible to achieve sobriety without needing to undergo a stay at any inpatient rehab establishment!

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