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Mixing Alcohol and Drugs

mixing alcohol with drugs

Mixing alcohol and drugs is certainly not to be recommended and yet millions of men and women do this on a regular basis.

It is extremely important to understand that the body reacts differently dependent upon what type of drug is being used while also drinking alcohol

Depressant and stimulant combination:

Many mistakenly believe that alcohol is a stimulant. It is not, it is a depressant. If a stimulant drug such as cocaine or ecstasy is taken and then the user drinks alcohol they are creating unwanted competition.

This is because the depressant (alcohol) works by slowing down the brain and central nervous system while the stimulant drug (i.e. cocaine) performs in the opposite way and speeds things up.

The result of these competing reactions creates immediate and noticeable pressure on the brain and central nervous system.

Mixing alcohol with a stimulant drug is far and away the most common form of this type of abuse. Here is an example why:

Alcohol and cocaine:

This is a very popular and accepted practice. It is also a potentially deadly partnership. This combination can lead to fits, it increases the chances of a heart attack, and in extreme cases can result in sudden death.

When the two substances interact it can cause the body to create cocaethylene. This highly toxic substance forms in the liver.

Cocaethylene also increases alcohol’s depressive effects while magnifying the effects of cocaine. Another negative is that aggressive tendencies are often increased when the two substances are taken together.

Cocaethylene lingers longer:

It is also vital to understand that cocaethylene remains in the body for a longer period than either cocaine or alcohol.

While this toxic substance is in your system it is causing extended stress and pressure on heart and liver functions.

Depressant and Depressant combination:

The second combination to consider is when a person mixes a depressant (alcohol) with a depressant drug such as heroin. As already mentioned, depressants slow down the brain and nervous system, so by mixing these two substances a person is increasing this slow down rate.

If taken to the extreme this dual slow down can result in the body shutting down completely.

Quality and content of street drugs:

Another factor that must be taken into account is the purity and make-up of the street drugs a person is buying.

There are no standard quality checks on the drugs sold and the buyer generally has no knowledge whatsoever of other ‘ingredients’ they actually contain.

These unknown factors are dangerous enough on their own, but if mixed with alcohol a person is leaving themselves wide open for short and long term damage. This damage can be physical as well as psychological.

Don’t risk the unknown:

It is clear that drinking alcohol on an all too regular basis will cause unwanted health and social problems. Similarly, regular and increased drug use is a sure-fire route to dependence.

Those who see a combined use of the two as normal practice will find health and social issues far more quickly than they expect.

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